Training Options for your group or business

Kokamo Group works with small and medium businesses to provide First Aid, CPR and Safety recommendations to ensure safety in the workplace and that businesses are meeting OHS regulations for their industry.

To view a list of course offerings, please click here.

We are also a full service safety equipment provider.  We provide a wide variety of first aid kits, AEDs, and safety equipment.  Please contact our offices for a quote on your safety needs.

To view our products, please click here.

Kokamo Group is involved in our community.  We work with many non-profit and community organizations to provide training options for staff  and volunteers.  Our community services group provides medical first response and first aid treatment for special events around the City of Calgary and surrounding areas such as street festivals, sports tournaments and many more.

Unresponsive and Not Breathing – Adult

If an adult is unresponsive and not breathing, you’ll need to do CPR (which is short for cardiopulmonary resuscitation). CPR involves giving someone a combination of chest compressions and rescue breaths to keep their heart and circulation going to try to save their life. If they start breathing normally again, stop CPR and put them in the recovery position.

• To check if someone is unresponsive and not breathing, you need to assess the casualty using the Primary Survey.

• If you find they’re unresponsive and not breathing then you’ll need to call 911 for emergency medical help.

Step 1 of 5: Open their airway

  • • If they are unresponsive, open their airway.

• Place one hand on the casualty’s forehead and two fingers under their chin. Gently tilt their head back and lift the chin.

Open the airway

Step 2 of 5: Check their breathing

  • • Maintain the head tilt and chin lift, and look for chest movement. Listen for the sounds of normal breathing and see if you can feel their breaths on your cheek.

If they are not breathing, you need to start CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation – a combination of chest pressure and rescue breaths) straight away.

Check their breathing

Step 3 of 5: Call for help and start CPR

  • • Call 911 for an ambulance, or get someone else to do it.

Next you’ll need to perform CPR – cardiopulmonary resuscitation. This involves giving someone chest compressions and rescue breaths to keep their heart and circulation going.

If they start breathing normally again, stop CPR and put them in the recovery position.

Call for helpRecovery position

 

Step 4 of 5: Giving chest compressions

  • • Kneel down beside the casualty on the floor level with their chest.
  • • Place the heel of one hand towards the end of their breastbone, in the center of their chest.

Give chest compressionsHand positions adult

  • • Place the heel of your other hand on top of the first hand and interlock your fingers, making sure you keep the fingers off the ribs.
  • • Lean over the casualty, with your arms straight, pressing down vertically on the breastbone, and press the chest down by 5-6cm (2-2½in).
  • • Release the pressure without removing your hands from their chest. Allow the chest to come back up fully – this is one compression.
  • • Repeat 30 times, at a rate of about twice a second or the speed of the song ‘Staying Alive’.
  • Give two rescue breaths.

Step 5 of 5: How to give a rescue breath

  • • Ensure the casualty’s airway is open.
  • • Pinch their nose firmly closed.
  • • Take a deep breath and seal your lips around their mouth.
  • • Blow into the mouth until the chest rises.
  • • Remove your mouth and allow the chest to fall.
  • • Repeat once more.

Carry on giving 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths for as long as you can, or until help arrives.

If the casualty starts breathing normally again, stop CPR and put them in the recovery position.

Seizures

A seizure can be caused by something interrupting the electrical activity in the brain. This leads the muscles in the body to contract uncontrollably and usually causes the person to lose responsiveness. It’s also known as a convulsion or fit.

In adults, seizures are the most common symptom of epilepsy, but they can be caused by other things, such as a head injury, alcohol poisoning or someone with diabetes having a ‘hypo’ when their blood glucose is too low.

Epilepsy is a condition which affects the brain and causes repeated seizures, which are often sudden and dramatic.

What to look for – seizures

With any kind of seizure it is really important to keep checking:

• their level of response and pulse

• and that the person is breathing.

It is also important to protect them from harming themselves during the fit

If you think someone is having a seizure, there are six key things to look for:

  1. 1. Sudden loss of responsiveness
  2. 2. Rigid body with an arching back
  3. 3. Noisy difficult breathing
  4. 4. Convulsions (jerky uncontrolled movements)
  5. 5. Loss of bladder and bowel control
  6. 6. Afterwards they may be confused, tired and fall into a deep sleep

What you need to do – seizures

Don’t restrain or move them.

Protect them from hurting themselves. Clear away any potentially dangerous objects, like hot drinks or sharp objects.

Make a note of the time when the seizure started and how long it lasts.

Protect their head by placing something soft underneath it, like a towel, and loosen any clothing around their neck.

Once the seizure has stopped, they may fall into a deep sleep – if they do, open their airway and check their breathing.

If they’re breathing, put them in the recovery position.

Recovery position

If they stop breathing at any point, prepare to treat someone who is unresponsive and not breathing.

Keep checking their breathing, pulse and level of response.

Call 911 for medical help if:

• it’s the casualty’s first seizure, or the cause is unknown

• they’re having repeated seizures

• the seizure lasts more than five minutes

• they’re unresponsive for more than ten minutes.

Unresponsive breathing adult

Unresponsiveness can last for a few seconds (e.g. fainting) or for a long time. It’s often brought on by serious illness or injury (e.g. a head injury), or by taking alcohol or other drugs. Find out what to do if an adult is unresponsive and breathing.

What to look for – Unresponsive and breathing adult

When someone looks like they’re asleep but they’re unable to respond to noise or body contact, it’s likely they’re unresponsive.

What you need to do – Unresponsive and breathing adult

Step 1 of 5: Open the airway

  • • Place one hand on the casualty’s forehead and gently tilt their head back. As you do this, the mouth will fall open slightly.
  • • Place the fingertips of your other hand on the point of the casualty’s chin and lift the chin.

Open the airway

Step 2 of 5: Check breathing

  • • Look, listen and feel for normal breathing – chest movement, sounds and breaths on your cheek. Do this for no more than ten seconds.

Check for breathing

Step 3 of 5: Put them in the recovery position

  • • This will keep their airway open.
  • • Kneel down next to them on the floor.

The next three steps are for if you find the casualty lying on their back. If you find them lying on their side or their front you may not need all three.

  • 1. Place their arm nearest you at a right angle to their body, with their palm facing upwards.
  • 2. Take their other arm and place it across their chest so the back of their hand is against their cheek nearest you, and hold it there. With your other hand, lift their far knee and pull it up until their foot is flat on the floor.
  • 3. Now you’re ready to roll them onto their side. Carefully pull on their bent knee and roll them towards you. Once you’ve done this, the top arm should be supporting the head and the bent leg should be on the floor to stop them from rolling over too far.

Step 4 of 5: If you suspect spinal injury

  • • If you think the casualty could have a spinal injury, you must keep their neck as still as possible. Instead of tilting their neck, use the jaw thrust technique: place your hands on either side of their face and with your fingertips gently lift the jaw to open the airway, avoiding any movement of their neck.

Jaw thrust

Step 5 of 5: Call for help

  • • Once you’ve put them safely into the recovery position, call 911 for medical help.
  • • Until help arrives, keep checking the casualty’s breathing.

If they stop breathing at any point, call 911 straight away and get ready to give them CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation – a combination of chest pressure and rescue breaths).

Call for help

Source: St John Ambulance First Aid Reference Guide

First Aid Training April 29-30

Kokamo Group will be offering both a Emergency First Aid and Standard First Aid courses on April 29 to 30, 2017

To register, please call (587)333-6869 or email info@kokamogroup.com

Emergency First Aid – CPR A & AED • ONE DAY $110

In this one-day course, students will learn to recognize and provide interventions for life-threatening emergencies until medical aid arrives. Topics include: CPR and choking for adults, shock and unconsciousness, severe bleeding, head & spinal injuries, major medical conditions, and AED training and certification.  Running April 29

Standard First Aid – CPR C & AED • TWO DAY

This two-day course covers all the skills in Emergency First Aid plus first aid for other injuries and illnesses including head and spinal injuries, fractures of the upper and lower limbs. This course includes Level C CPR training and certification (Adult, Child, Infant, and 2-rescuer resuscitation) and AED training and certification.  Running April 29 to 30

Heat exhaustion

Heat exhaustion is caused by a loss of salt and water from the body, usually through excessive sweating.

It develops slowly and usually happens to people who aren’t used to hot, humid weather. People who are unwell are more likely to get it, especially if they are suffering from vomiting and diarrhea.

A dangerous and common cause of heat exhaustion is when the body produces more heat than it can cope with.

This can happen when someone takes a non-prescription drug, like ecstasy, which can stop the body from regulating its temperature properly. If someone gets hot and sweats a lot from dancing as well, they may get overheated and dehydrated, giving them heat exhaustion.

If treated quickly, someone suffering from heat exhaustion should start feeling better quickly. But if not treated, they could develop heatstroke which can lead to death.

Watch this instructional video for more information or continue reading below.

What to look for – Heat exhaustion

These are the six key things to look for:

  1. 1. Headache
  2. 2. Dizziness and confusion
  3. 3. Loss of appetite and feeling sick
  4. 4. Sweating with pale clammy skin
  5. 5. Cramps in the arms, legs and stomach
  6. 6. Fast, weakening pulse and shallow breathing

What you need to do – Heat exhaustion

• Help take them to a cool place and get them to lie down with their legs raised.

• Then give them lots of water. You can also give them a sports drink like Powerade or an oral re-hydration solution to help replace the salt and fluid they have lost by sweating.

• Keep checking their breathing, pulse and level of response.

• Even if they recover quickly, suggest they see a doctor.

• If they seem to be getting worse, place them into the recovery position and call 911 for an ambulance.

Recovery position

• While waiting, keep checking their breathing, pulse and level of response.

Source: St John Ambulance First Aid Reference Guide

Heatstroke

Heatstroke is caused by a failure of the thermostat in the brain which regulates the body temperature. If someone has a high fever or has been exposed to heat for a long time, then their body can become dangerously overheated.

Someone can also get heatstroke after using drugs such as ecstasy.

Sometimes, people get heatstroke after suffering from heat exhaustion. When someone gets too dehydrated they stop sweating which means their body can’t cool down anymore, so they develop heatstroke.

Heatstroke can develop with very little warning, causing unresponsiveness within minutes of someone feeling unwell. Your priority is to cool them down as quickly as possible and get them to hospital.

Watch this instructional video for more information or continue reading below.

What to look for – heatstroke

These are the six key things to look for:

  1. 1. Headache, dizziness and discomfort
  2. 2. Restlessness and confusion
  3. 3. Hot flushed and dry skin
  4. 4. A fast deterioration in the level of response
  5. 5. A full bounding pulse
  6. 6. Body temperature above 40°C (104°F)

What you need to do – heatstroke

• Quickly move them to a cool place and remove their outer clothing but ensure you maintain their dignity.

• Then call 911 for an ambulance.

• Wrap them in a cold wet sheet and keep pouring cold water over it until their temperature falls to at least 38°C (or 100.4°F). Measure this with a thermometer under their tongue or under their armpit.

• If you can’t find a sheet, fan them or sponge them down with cold water to keep them cool.

• Once their temperature seems to have gone back to normal, replace the wet sheet with a dry sheet.

• While waiting for help to arrive, keep checking their temperature, as well as their breathing, pulse and level of response.

• If they start getting hot again, repeat the cooling process to lower their temperature.

• If they lose responsiveness at any point, open their airway, check their breathing and prepare to treat someone who’s become unresponsive.

Source: St John Ambulance First Aid Reference Guide

Standard First Aid Re-Cert April 20

Standard First Aid – CPR Re-certification • ONE DAY

This 1-day re-certification is a challenge of the Standard First Aid course content and requires the student to demonstrate essential skills as well as pass the theoretical exam. This challenge is open to those who have a current Standard First Aid certificate from an Alberta OH&S approved program with Level A or C CPR and with AED.  Learning materials are provided for review upon registration of the course.

This re-certification course is intended for those who use their First Aid skills on a regular basis and are able to demonstrate their competency in all required skill areas. Unsuccessful candidates will be required to take a full course at their cost.
Call (587)333-6869 to register for this course.

Head injuries

All head injuries are potentially serious because they can damage the brain and make someone lose responsiveness. The severity of a head injury depends on how someone hit their head and how hard the impact was.

A head injury may cause damage to the brain tissue or to blood vessels inside the skull, or even break the skull (a skull fracture). Clear fluid or watery blood leaking from the ear or nose, and a deteriorating level of response, are some of the signs of serious injury.

These are the most common things which may happen if someone has had a head injury:

Concussion is a brief period of unresponsiveness – someone with concussion may be confused, but only for a short time, followed by complete recovery.

Cerebral compression – a severe blow to the head can cause bleeding or swelling inside the skull that can press on the brain – this is called cerebral compression and is life-threatening.

Skull fracture – if  there is a head wound this is a sign that there may be deeper damage within the head, like a crack or break in the skull (skull fracture), which may be serious.

Spinal injury – you should always assume that someone who has had a head injury may also have a neck (spinal) injury and treat them for this as well.

Click here to watch a instructional video for more information or continue reading below.

What to look for – Head injuries

If you think someone has a head injury, there are six key things you should look for:

  1. 1. Brief loss of responsiveness
  2. 2. Scalp wound
  3. 3. Dizziness or nausea
  4. 4. Loss of memory of events before or during the injury
  5. 5. Headache
  6. 6. Confusion

For a severe head injury, you also need to look for:

  • reduced level of response
    • loss of responsiveness
    • leakage of blood or watery fluid from the ear or nose
    • unequal pupil size

What you need to do – Head injuries

  1. Sit them down and give them something cold to hold against the injury. You can use a cold compress, or a bag of ice or frozen peas wrapped in a cloth.
  2. Treat any scalp wounds like a bleed, by applying direct pressure to the wound.
  3. Check their level of responsiveness, using the AVPU scale below. Make a note of their reactions, especially any changes to their level of response, to pass on to the ambulance, in case you have to call one.

The AVPU scale – alert, voice, pain, unresponsive

AAlert: Are they alert? Are their eyes open and do they respond to questions?

VVoice: Do they respond to voice? Can they answer simple questions and respond to instructions?

PPain: If they’re not alert or they’re not responding to your voice – do they respond to pain? Try pinching them – do they move or open their eyes?

UUnresponsive: Do they respond to questions or a gentle shake?

If they are alert or responsive then they’re responsive and their head injury is probably mild, but you should wait with them until they recover.

If they’re not alert or responsive then they may be partially or fully unresponsive and their head injury could be severe. Call 911 for an ambulance and explain their response to the AVPU test.

If they lose responsiveness at any point, open their airway, check their breathing and prepare to treat someone who’s become unresponsive.

While you’re waiting for an ambulance, keep checking their breathing, pulse and any changes in their level of response.

Other factors to look for

If they:

  • are over 65
  • have been drinking or taking drugs
  • have been unresponsive for even a few seconds, or
  • if you think they’re getting worse

encourage them to get medical help.

Source: St John Ambulance First Aid Reference Guide

First Aid Training April 11 & 12

First Aid Training Classes Available

Emergency First Aid CPR A with AED – April 11

Cost $110

Standard First Aid CPR C with AED – April 11 to 12

Cost $150

To Register, call (587)333-6869

or by clicking here to download our registration form

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Kokamo Group 119 Douglas Ridge Mews SE Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2Z 2M2 +1(587)333-6869